POMPEII: THE EXHIBITION logo

Forgotten for centuries after the catastrophic eruption of Mount Vesuvius, and then rediscovered over 250 years ago, POMPEII: THE EXHIBITION features nearly 200 artifacts, including frescoes, mosaics, and precious items belonging to the residents of Pompeii.

Open now through October 22

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About the Exhibit

Daily Life in Pompeii

Life in Pompeii exhibit scene

Explore the ancient city of Pompeii through vivid reproductions of an atrium from a Roman villa, bustling streets and marketplaces, and more!

Precious Artifacts

Gladiator armor and painting

Nearly 200 authentic artifacts bring Pompeii to life, including art, gladiator helmets, weapons, and jewelry on loan from Naples National Archaeological Museum.

4D Theater

Mt. Vesuvius explosion

Experience the fury of Vesuvius in an immersive theater experience with vivid sights, sounds, and shaking ground. 

Body Casts

Body casts from Pompeii exhibit

Witness the largest collection of authentic full body casts ever presented — human forms frozen in time. 

Two Pompeii visitors in front of display case
FAQs
Learn more about what to expect, how to plan your visit, and the history of Pompeii and Mount Vesuvius.

Exhibition FAQs

Q. What are the dates this exhibition will be open?

A. POMPEII: THE EXHIBITION will be on view from June 24 to October 22.

 

Q. Will there be an additional cost to attend the exhibit?

A. Yes. Tickets to POMPEII: THE EXHIBITION, which include general museum admission, are $26 for adults, $17 for youth (ages 3-13), and $22 for seniors (ages 63+). Prices for OMSI Members, which include admission to a giant screen Empirical film, are $16 for adults, $10 for youth, and $12 for seniors.

 

Q. I have young children with me, can I bring my stroller into the exhibition?

A. Strollers are not permitted inside the exhibition due to the fragile artifacts within. There is a designated space outside the exhibition entrance where you can park your stroller.

 

Q. When are the best times to visit the exhibition? When is the last admission to the exhibition?

A. OMSI is generally busiest during the late mornings and early afternoons. In order to avoid crowds, the best times to visit are when OMSI opens at 9:30 a.m., or later in the day, after 4 p.m. During the summer, the museum is open until 7 p.m. Please note, however, that same-day admission tickets for POMPEII: THE EXHIBITION will not be sold after 6 p.m. to allow guests adequate time to view the exhibition.

 

Q. Is this exhibition appropriate for young children?

A. Adults and children are welcome to visit POMPEII: THE EXHIBITION, which has been visited by over 800,000 people during its North American tours. However, the exhibition may not be suitable for some children. The exhibition includes body casts of those who died in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius as well as a small, separate section that discusses erotic art in ancient Pompeii. Because every family is different and children are at varying stages of development, we recommend that you become familiar with and discuss the exhibition with any accompanying children before deciding whether or not to share the experience with them.

 

Historical and Archaeological FAQs

Q. When did Mount Vesuvius erupt?

A. Mount Vesuvius erupted on August 24, 79 AD, and sent a cloud of ashes, pumice, rocks and hot volcanic gases into the sky that people could see for hundreds of miles.

 

Q. What happened when the volcano erupted?

A. Days before the eruption, tremors shook Pompeii and surrounding cities more frequently. Shortly before noon the volcano erupted and by 1:00 p.m. the dust and ash had completely covered the sky. By 8:00 p.m. the eruptions had grown more violent creating heavy debris of falling ash and pumice that buried Pompeii and its neighboring cities, Herculaneum and Stabiae. Eruptions and earthquakes continued into the next day and that morning, the largest pyroclastic flows of hot ashes, volcanic gases and debris made their way through the streets of Pompeii completely destroying the city. In just two minutes the city streets were covered in almost 8 feet of hot ash. On the morning of August 26, the eruption finally stopped, leaving almost 5 cubic miles of pumice and ash covering approximately 186 miles of land.

 

Q. How long did people have to evacuate?

A. Though earthquakes began days before the eruption, most Pompeians did not view them as potential warning signs. With the eruption occurring just after 12:00 p.m., it is believed residents of Pompeii had only a few hours to evacuate the city.

 

Q. How was the city preserved?

A. The large amount of ash (known as a pyroclastic flow) that covered the city acted as a preservative. During a pyroclastic flow, enormous volumes of extremely hot gases, ash, and rocks rush down the side of a volcano, like an avalanche; there are also big explosions and large, billowing clouds. This mixture of ash, rock and gas, covered the city and froze it in time.

 

Q. Why did Pompeii remain undiscovered for so long?

A. Due to the sheer volume of ash and pumice that covered the city, Pompeii was thought to be lost forever.

 

Q. How many people died during the eruption?

A. About three-quarters of Pompeii's 165 acres have been excavated, and some 1,150 bodies have been discovered out of about 2,000 thought to have died in the city when it was destroyed. This means that the vast majority of the city of 20,000 fled at the first signs of the volcanic activity.

 

Q. What is the present status of Pompeii?

A. The ancient city of Pompeii is a world-renowned tourist attraction that has seen the likes of over 25 million visitors. Though sections of it are currently visible to tourists, much of the city remains protected due to the moratorium imposed by Professor Pietro Giovanni Guzzo, the superintendent of the site.

 

Q. Is Mount Vesuvius still active?

A. Yes. Mount Vesuvius is the only active volcano in mainland Europe, and has produced some of the continent's largest volcanic eruptions. Located on Italy's west coast, it overlooks the Bay and City of Naples and sits in the crater of the ancient Somma volcano.

 

Q. What kind of volcano is Mount Vesuvius?

A. Mount Vesuvius is a stratovolcano, also called composite volcanoes, because they are built of layers of alternating lava flow, ash and blocks of stone. These volcanoes have a conduit system inside them that channels magma from deep within the Earth to the surface. Stratovolcanoes erupt with great violence. Pressure builds in the magma chamber as gases, under immense heat and pressure, are dissolved in the liquid rock. When the magma reaches the conduits the pressure is released and the gases explode. Because they form in a system of underground conduits, stratovolcanoes may blow out the sides of the cone as well as the summit crater.

 

Ticket Prices

Pompeii visitors viewing a body cast

  • POMPEII: THE EXHIBITION plus Museum Admission
  • $26 Adult
  • $22 Senior (63+)
  • $17 Youth (3-13)
  •  
  • POMPEII: THE EXHIBITION OMSI Member Pricing*
  • Each admission includes one free Empirical Theater ticket
  • $16 Adult
  • $12 Senior (63+)
  • $10 Youth (3-13)
  •  

*OMSI members always receive free general admission to the museum's permanent exhibits

Mark Spencer Hotel Package

Mark Spencer Hotel entrance

Book an overnight stay at The Mark Spencer Hotel located in heart of Downtown Portland, located near Powell’s Books where the West End meets the Pearl District!

  • Overnight Accommodations
  • 2 Tickets to POMPEII: THE EXHIBITION
  • 2 All Day TriMet Tickets
  • Overnight Parking

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Upcoming Events

OMSI After Dark: Explosions event image
OMSI After Dark: Explosions

July 26, 7PM

Explore all things explosive as we blow the lid off the science behind blasts.

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A volcano erupting
Science Pub Portland: Volcanoes

August 15, 7-9PM

Join us for a night of amazing stories, pictures and video from three international volcano scientists as they share their experiences studying active volcanoes and responding to catastrophic eruptions.

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Hands-On Activities

Mt. St. Helens

Life among active volcanoes drives scientific discovery and regional identity in the Pacific Northwest. Much like the residents of Pompeii, living in the shadow of the Cascade Range has changed our past and will affect our future. Learn more about volcanology and the dynamic Earth Sciences in our backyard through museum-wide programming and hands-on activities in the exhibition. 

Meet a Volcanologist

After traveling back to 79 A.D. to experience the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, explore modern day science through the eyes of scientists who dedicate their lives to studying volcanoes. Here, and in the exhibition, read interviews with several Pacific Northwest volcanologists describing their work and their passion for Earth Science!

Peter Frenzen
Peter Frenzen
Peter Frenzen works as a Monument Scientist for the US Forest Service at Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument.

What made you want to study volcanoes?

I had the opportunity to study forest re-establishment on a 33-year-old mudflow deposit at Mount Rainier National Park which sparked my interest in how volcanoes influence the vegetation around them. After Mount St. Helens erupted in 1980, I decided to attend graduate school at Oregon State University where I studied how the 1980 eruption destroyed forests around Mount St. Helens and how it created an amazing array of new habitats which, in time, became amazingly diverse and productive ecosystems. 

>What research are you currently doing with volcanoes?

In my job as Monument Scientist I work with other scientists to help them initiate and maintain their research studies and to make sure their exciting research discoveries are incorporated in our programs and exhibits. Even after 30-years, Mount St. Helens continues to amaze me and, I’m hooked! 

What advice would you have for young volcanologists?

To study hard and learn as much as you can about geology and the process of science.  Good scientists have more questions than answers. In science, it’s being able to ask good questions and develop and test new ideas that’s most important.

What is your favorite volcano and why?

Why Mount St. Helens of course!  It’s the youngest, most active volcano in the Cascade Range and has created an amazing natural laboratory for the study of earth processes.

Sonja Melander
Sonja Melander
Sonja Melander is a Science Education Coordinator at Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument.

What made you want to study volcanoes?

Growing up, I loved playing in dirt, reading books, and solving puzzles.  I grew up in North Carolina, which does not have any volcanoes, but I was captivated by everyday experiences of seeing geology in the world.  I remember seeing pink landscaping stone (rose quartz) at a gas station and thinking to myself “where did all of these jewels come from?!”  In third grade, I first heard the incredible story of Paricutin, a volcano which grew out of a Mexican farmer’s cornfield in 1943.  My curiosity of these wonders and my love of solving puzzles put me on my science journey.  In college, I decided to study volcanoes, not just because they are interesting, but because understanding what volcanoes do and how they work is important is important for people.   For those that work, live or play near volcanoes like Mount St. Helens, understanding what scientists have learned about volcanoes is an important part of staying safe.     

What research are you currently doing with volcanoes?

Currently I am a science educator at Mount St. Helens.  Although I love the puzzle-solving of scientific research, I was ultimately drawn to education.  Scientific knowledge is for us all and sharing science is what I do.

What advice would you have for young volcanologists?

Success in science is not about how good you are at memorizing facts or taking tests; it is about curiosity and critical thinking. Keep wondering about things and asking “why?”!  If you are curious about something a scientist is doing, ask them about it!  Finally, it is important to remember that nobody is perfect and that you should never to be too hard on yourself or tell yourself you can’t follow your dreams. Don’t let the world tell you what you can or can’t do with your life; YOU tell the world!

What is your favorite volcano and why?

That’s a difficult question!  Like people, each volcano is a unique individual.  Right now, Mount St. Helens is my favorite volcano.  I love to explore and hike around Mount St. Helens and there is always more to learn!  One of my favorite parts about my job is learning new things.  Mount St. Helens is a “living laboratory” that is always teaching us new, interesting science stories!

Adam Kent
Adam Kent
Adam Kent is a Professor of Geology at Oregon State University (OSU).

What made you want to study volcanoes?

I grew up in Australia, where there are very few volcanoes and no active volcanoes. When I saw my first big stratovolcanoes (on the island of Bali and then in New Zealand) I was amazed and I knew that I really wanted to do research in these types of settings. I have subsequently come to appreciate the fact that volcanoes represent an extreme set of conditions that are not really seen anywhere on Earth. That’s pretty cool. For geologists, volcanoes also bring magmas from deep in the Earth to the surface – providing us with samples to study that we could not get any other way. We know a lot about the way that the deep Earth works – processes such as plate tectonics for example – from the study of volcanic rocks.

What research are you currently doing with volcanoes?

I work in the Cascades and also have several projects overseas (Saudi Arabia for example). In the Cascades I have worked on Mount Hood for many years, focusing on understanding how the magmatic system beneath the volcano works, mainly by studying the chemistry of minerals in the erupted lavas. I also have projects going in Central Oregon, looking at some volcanic rocks produced by large explosive volcanic eruptions over the last 6 million years. We are trying to work out why occasionally you can get really big eruptions, when most of the time smaller eruptions predominate.

What advice would you have for young volcanologists?

First – enjoy the process! Find a set of research tools that you enjoy working with and really master them. Apply these tools where you can, and and then be prepared to collaborate with others who use different tools. Look for the areas of productive research where your expertise and that of others overlap. In my case I use lots of geochemical tools – chemical and isotopic analyses of volcanic rocks and the minerals inside them. I have also focused on laboratory techniques used to get this data, and run a laboratory that can make a lot of these measurements. For others I work with colleagues.

What is your favorite volcano and why?

There is a lot to choose from, but my favourite volcano is Mount Hood! Apart from being Oregon’s highest peak and most recently erupted volcano (last major eruption around 1780) it is also a beautiful peak. There is also an interesting contrast between the younger land surfaces of the south side that result from eruptions over the last few thousand years, to the older steep north side where landforms are dominated by glaciation. Any future eruptions will also have important implications for Portland and surround regions.

Anita Grunder
Anita Grunder
Anita Grunder is a Professor of Geology and Associate Dean of Academic Programs at OSU.

What made you want to study volcanoes?

I had two terrific field experiences as an assistant in the field to volcanologists (one PhD student and one USGS staff member). We studied deposits from explosive volcanoes and it was fascinating. I am especially interested in the behavior of volcanic centers over the long time scale, thousands to millions of years.

What research are you currently doing with volcanoes?

I have projects in eastern Oregon, in the Cascades, and in the central Andes. What ties these together is an abiding interest in the interaction between magma and the crust is rises through before ultimately erupting at a volcano. Where does magma accumulate? How does magma change composition, which in turn affects how it erupts? How does it become rich in gas and explosive? And, how does tectonic setting affect these factors?

What advice would you have for young volcanologists?

Volcanology is a super broad field, from how eruptions affect people to the physics of earthquakes to satellite sensing methods to the chemistry of magma. It is easy to find a passion in that realm. Be interested in international work, most volcanoes are abroad. Reach out to people doing field work (there are all kinds of work to be done) and get some experience.

What is your favorite volcano and why?

My favorite volcano is in central Chile. It’s name is Descabezado Grande, which means the Big Beheaded One. It has a large crater at the top and has craters on its flanks. I saw it often when I was working in the field to the east of it. It is beautiful, and looks just like volcano should. And it has a great name.

Bill Chadwick
Bill Chadwick
Bill Chadwick is a Research Professor at OSU in Newport, Oregon.

What made you want to study volcanoes?

I was a geology major in college when Mount St. Helens erupted in 1980.  I volunteered and then worked with the US Geological Survey there soon afterward and got hooked on the excitement of studying a “live” volcano.

What research are you currently doing with volcanoes?

I study underwater volcanoes in the ocean, including Axial Seamount, which is located about 300 miles offshore the Oregon coast and is also very active, having had 3 eruptions in the last 20 years.  We’re learning about how eruptions can be predicted there (and hopefully elsewhere too) and what impacts submarine eruptions have on the overlying ocean.

What advice would you have for young volcanologists?

Study lots of geology in school.  Find what are the most interesting and exciting aspects to you, and then learn as much as you can about them.  Get a taste of what research is like by volunteering or working at or near a volcano.

What is your favorite volcano and why?

One of my favorites is Fernandina volcano in the Galapagos islands.  I like it because it is such a wild and beautiful place.  It is an uninhabited island and hosts many of the wonderful species that live in the Galapagos.  It feels like the edge of the world and the edge of time itself.

Fred Swanson
Fred Swanson
Fred Swanson is a former Research Geologist with the US Forest Service and affiliate professor at OSU, now retired.

What made you want to study volcanoes?

Their dynamism, beauty, and unpredictability are all appealing. Also, they occur in such interesting places around the world – travel to visit volcanoes is very interesting and exciting.

What research are you currently doing with volcanoes?

Right now I am working on two volcano matters:  1. an analysis of the contribution of researchers at Mount St. Helens to the global literature about response of ecosystems to eruptions beginning with the big blast from Krakatoa in 1883 and 2. A publication about effects of the 2015 eruption of Calbuco volcano in Chile on forests.  In general I study what happens when geology and ecology meet.

What advice would you have for young volcanologists?

Go for it!  Study hard, build a good base of knowledge, and a good work ethic.  You can never tell where your career can lead.  I feel so lucky to have worked on volcanoes since I was a college student; they have taken me all over the world.

What is your favorite volcano and why?

I love them all, but Mount St. Helens has been my teacher and given me so many lessons and opportunities.

Seth Moran
Seth Moran
Seth Moran is a Scientist-in-Charge and Seismologist at the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory.

What made you want to study volcanoes?

I’ve been fascinated by volcanoes and earthquakes for almost as long as I can remember. As a kid the stories of eruptions in Italy, Iceland, and Hawaii captured my imagination; eruptions are spectacular demonstrations of Nature’s power and beauty, eruptions form beautiful mountains and lava-flow fields, and it’s an incredible thing to watch new rock being formed before your eyes. Plus, eruptions are predictable, at least in a general way, and eruptions impact society, mostly in small ways but sometimes in large ways – all of which means that there’s a role for science to play in helping society live with volcanoes. All of those factors contributed to my decision to pursue a career studying volcanoes.

What research are you currently doing with volcanoes?

I’ve been focused on trying to understand Mount St. Helens seismicity for much of my research career. I’ve also recently been part of a group of scientists focused on trying to “image” the crust beneath Mount St. Helens, with the goal of identifying places where magma is stored beneath the volcano.  More broadly, I’ve been working for the last decade to improve seismic monitoring capabilities.

What advice would you have for young volcanologists?

Volcanoes can be studied from so many different angles; geology, hydrology, seismology, geochemistry, remote sensing, computer modeling, engineering, and even sociology. The trick is to find one of those field that interests you and pursue degrees in that field while also keeping in mind how it can be used to study volcanoes.

What is your favorite volcano and why?

Each of them is different, so it’s hard to pick just one.  The 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens was what turned my childhood interest in volcanoes into a professional one, and it was also the first volcano I studied during my graduate work. So if I had to pick one, MSH would be it.

Peter Kelly
Peter Kelly
Peter Kelly is a Research Geologist for the USGS.

What made you want to study volcanoes?

Volcanoes piqued my interest early on because they are beautiful, powerful, and mysterious.  In addition, I was interested in utilizing science to benefit society; studying volcanoes allows me to do that.

What research are you currently doing with volcanoes?

I am a gas geochemist.  Currently, my primary focus is on developing and deploying novel instruments to autonomously monitor the compositions of gases emitted from volcanoes.  These data allow us to better understand magmatic and hydrothermal systems and help to improve eruption forecasts.

What advice would you have for young volcanologists?

Follow your curiosity, keep an open mind, explore new ideas and places, be passionate about your work, and have fun.

What is your favorite volcano and why?

I don’t have a favorite volcano.  Rather, my favorite hunk of rock is a ~1 billion-year-old granitic gneiss found in the Hudson River Valley, New York, close to where I grew up.  Perhaps that old intrusion fed some volcanoes a long time ago, but it was the geology of that area that initially sparked my interest in earth science and I’ve simply been following that thread, awe-struck, ever since.

Laura Clor
Laura Clor
Laura Clor is a Gas Geochemist with the USGS.

What made you want to study volcanoes?

I like that it pairs my natural inclination toward science with the ability to provide help to people and communities.

What research are you currently doing with volcanoes?

I measure the gases that are emitted by active volcanoes. Magma at depth has various gases dissolved in it, such as CO2, SO2, and HCl. As the magma rises toward the surface, each type of gas is released at a different depth, depending on its solubility. Measuring the proportions of these different gases at the surface enables us to track the movement of magma while it is still underground.

What advice would you have for young volcanologists?

Here in the Pacific Northwest we have so many volcanoes around us -- go visit them and spend some time hiking around! Part of why I am where I am now is my love of being outdoors and observing the world around me.

What is your favorite volcano and why?

Kilauea volcano in Hawai`i is an incredible natural laboratory. It has been continuously erupting since 1983, producing vast quantities of both lava and gases. It is truly awe-inspiring to be able to visit Kilauea and study in person how the Earth is made.

Benjamin Pauk
Benjamin Pauk
Benjamin Pauk is a Geophysicist with the USGS.

What made you want to study volcanoes?

When I was a kid, my father worked as contractor for the U.S. Navy and was stationed at Sigonella Naval Air base on the island of Sicily and since he was not military, our family couldn't live on the military base.  So we lived off of the base in a small town called Belpasso, located on the southern flanks of the volcano Mt. Etna.  What I remember the most about living on the volcano was one evening there was a powerful earthquake and it woke everyone in the neighborhood up. I recall going outside and in to the streets with my parents and looking up at Mt. Etna in the distance and seeing streams of lava flowing down the volcano.  As a kid, I was excited about seeing the volcano erupt and the streams of red hot lava, but it wasn't until I was in college and went on my first geology field trip to Mount St. Helens that I really made the connection between what I saw as kid and what I was studying in college that me realize I wanted to spend my life working outdoors on volcanoes.

What research are you currently doing with volcanoes?

My work primarily focuses on designing, installing and maintaining seismic and Global positioning systems (GPS) networks on volcanoes throughout Washington and Oregon to monitor and detect volcanic activity in real time.

What advice would you have for young volcanologists?

Don't be afraid to take chances and step out of your comfort zone and get your hands dirty when an opportunity of a lifetime present's itself to you.  Field work can be very challenging, but getting paid to work outdoors on a volcano makes that challenge very rewarding.

What is your favorite volcano and why?

My favorite volcano is Augustine Volcano in the Cook Inlet of Alaska.  During my first few years as a Geophysicist working in Alaska, I spent several months over the course of a few years working on the volcano and helped to establish the first complete robust GPS monitoring network on the volcano.  What I respect most about Augustine is that after we successfully installed 6 GPS stations on the volcano and declared victory in the fall of 2005, Augustine erupted and wiped out half of our network in the winter of 2006 in less than 20 minutes!  It was extremely fascinating and thrilling to go back out and work on the volcano in the summer of 2006 to see how the landscape had changed so dramatically and how easily the eruption destroyed our equipment!

Sarah Ogburn
Sarah Ogburn
Sarah Ogburn is a Research Geologist with the Volcano Disaster Assistance Program.

What made you want to study volcanoes?

I loved volcanoes, dinosaurs, bugs, and all things science when I was a kid. When I got to college, I discovered that I could have a career studying volcanoes! I especially love volcanology because it combines many sciences (geology, physics, chemistry, satellite remote sensing, computer science, social science, etc.) and uses them in an applied way that can have a direct, positive impact on people's lives.

What research are you currently doing with volcanoes?

I work for the USGS/USAID Volcano Disaster Assistance Program (VDAP), which responds to volcanic crises around the world. I build and analyze global databases of important information about volcanic eruptions. These databases then help us to forecast what might happen during future eruptions at volcanoes in the United States and in our partner countries.

What advice would you have for young volcanologists?

Volcanology is a big subject and has something for everyone with many paths that you can take. For me, it was important to take math, physics, and computer science courses in addition to geology classes.

What is your favorite volcano and why?

My favorite volcano is Soufrière Hills Volcano on the island of Montserrat in the West Indies. It is the first volcano I visited, and I did my PhD on its pyroclastic density currents. I also share a birthday with the current eruption!

Mary Benage
Mary Benage
Mary Benage is a Physical Volcanologist with the USGS Mendenhall Research Fellowship Program.

What made you want to study volcanoes?

I grew up playing in the canyons composed of the Bandelier Tuff from the Valles Caldera eruption in New Mexico. This childhood experience cultivated my fascination with volcanoes and I decided to focus on a science that allowed me to be outdoors and study these complex geologic features.

What research are you currently doing with volcanoes?

I am studying the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano. Augustine is located in the Cook Inlet of Alaska. For this study, I examine the textures of the rocks from the eruption to decipher the processes that occurred beneath the volcano before the eruption. I also use numerical models to help us better understand the physics of the eruption. 

What advice would you have for young volcanologists?

My advice is to follow your passion, ask questions, read, and take advantage of opportunities to learn directly from scientists.

What is your favorite volcano and why?

Cotopaxi Volcano in Ecuador. It is a picturesque snow-capped stratovolcano with a history of large explosive eruptions. The volcano has a scenic landscape, vibrant colors, and wild horses running along the flanks.

Angie Diefenbach
Angie Diefenbach
Angie Diefenbach is a Geologist with the USGS.

What made you want to study volcanoes?

I wanted to work in a field where I was helping people and I have always been interested in earth science and nature.  A career in volcanology has allowed me to combine hazard mitigation with scientific research.  And volcanoes have always intrigued me as they can both completely destroy and build landscapes.

What research are you currently doing with volcanoes?

I use a technique called photogrammetry to create high-resolution topographic models of volcanoes using images collected from various platforms from drones to helicopters to satellites.  When a volcano is erupting, I create successive models to calculate the volume and rate of lava being erupted.  A few restless volcanoes I am currently studying with this technique include Reventador volcano in Ecuador, Laguna del Maule volcanic field in Chile, Kelud volcano in Indonesia, Mount St. Helens in Washington, and Bogoslof volcano in Alaska.

What advice would you have for young volcanologists?

There’s always more than one way to solve a problem and that’s also true in volcanology.  Bring creativity to your work and don’t be afraid to experiment with new techniques to solve problems.  And always say yes to fieldwork opportunities--you learn the most from hands on experiences and seeing volcanoes and their processes first hand.

What is your favorite volcano and why?

My favorite volcano is Mount St. Helens because that is where I got my start in volcanology and it’s where I experienced my first eruption response (2004-2008 eruption).